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Frequently asked questions

We are often asked the same questions by customers, so we thought it would be useful to summarise below the most frequently asked questions. If you cannot see the answers you need here, please don't hesitate to give us a call on 0115 9400268 or click on the question bar on the bottom left of this page to email your question to us.
 

Faq 1: Table Room Size Guide

  Using 48" Cue Using 54" Cue Using 57" Cue
Table type & size inches metric cm inches metric cm inches metric cm
6x3 Pool Table 162 x 132 411 x 335 174 x 144 442 x 366 180 x 150 457 x 381
7x4 Pool Table 171 x 135 434 x 343 183 x 147 465 x 373 189 x 153 480 x 389
8x4 Pool Table 183 x 141 465 x 358 195 x 153 495 x 389 201 x 168 511 x 427
7ft American 179 x 139 455 x 353 191 x 151 485 x 384 197 x 151 500 x 427
8ft American 188 x 144 478 x 366 200 x 156 508 x 396 206 x 162 523 x 411
9ft American 200 x 149 508 x 378 212 x 161 538 x 409 218 x 167 554 x 424
6x3 Snooker Table 168 x 132 427 x 335 180 x 144 457 x 366 186 x 150 472 x 381
7x3'6" Snooker Table 180 x 138 457 x 351 192 x 150 488 x 381 198 x 156 503 x 396
8x4 Snooker Table 192 x 144 489 x 366 204 x 156 518 x 396 210 x 162 533 x 411
9x4'6" Snooker Table 204 x 150 518 x 381 216 x 162 549 x 411 222 x 168 564 x 427
10x5 Snooker Table 216 x 156 549 x 396 228 x 168 579 x 427 234 x 174 594 x 442
12x6 Snooker Table 240 x 168 610 x 427 252 x 180 640 x 457 258 x 186 455 x 472


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Faq 2: Table Dimensions

Table Type Playing Area Size of tables inc. Cushions Height to the playing surface from the floor Height to the top of cushion from the floor Height with Top
6ft UK Pool 5'6" x 2'6" 6' x 3' 30" 32" -
7ft UK Pool 6'6" x 3'6" 7' x 4' 30" 32" -
8ft UK Pool 7'6" x 4' 8' x 4'6" 30" 32" -
7ft American 7' x 3'6" 7'8" x 4'3" 30" 32" -
8ft American 8' x 4'1" 8'8" x 4'9" 30" 32" -
9ft American 9' x 4'7" 9'8" x 5'3" 30" 32" -
6ft Snooker 6' x 3' 6'5" x 3'5" 32" 34" -
6ft Snooker Diner 6' x 3' 6'5" x 3'5" 27"* 28"* 30"
7ft Snooker 7' x 3'6" 7'5" x 3'11" 32" 34" -
7ft Snooker Diner 7' x 3'6" 7'5" x 3'11" 27"* 28"* 30"
8ft Snooker 8' x 4' 8'6" x 4'6" 32" 34" -
9ft Snooker 9' x 4'6" 9'6" x 5' 32" 34" -
10ft Snooker 10' x 5' 10'6" x 5'6" 32" 34" -
12ft Snooker 12 x 6' 12'6" x 6'6" 32" 34"  


*with rise and fall option these dimensions will be as per normal snooker table

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Faq 3: Table Weights

Whilst it is true that the all up weight of a full size table can exceed 1.5 tons, this weight is well spread over a large area, and on eight legs. In addition timber floors act as a raft so spreading the load even further. The result of this is that any normal floor can carry the weight of a table without problems. It follows that smaller tables are even less of a problem. However, if you are building a snooker room from new you will need to comply with your local building regulations. If you need further advice, just ask.

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Faq 4: Ball Cleaning

I mean snooker balls, of course! Do not use detergents and definitely not a dishwasher, as these will fade the colours. I find car T-Cut is about the best, followed by a good wax polish. However, take care and try one ball first, and leave overnight, because there are several different types of materials used, so it is best to be on the safe side.

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Faq 5: The care of tables

The Nap on the bed-cloth of a table runs from the baulk end to the spot end. On the cushions the direction of the nap varies according to the make of table. The cloth is stretched tightly over the table when first fitted, but, but its natural characteristics allow it to stretch and in time it will become slack. When this happens it requires re-stretching by a skilled table fitter.
  Regular Brushing and Ironing - in the direction of the nap - are essential to the maintenance of the table's efficiency. First, brush to remove all dirt, using only the tip of the brush at the ends of the table. Second, go over the table again wth a duster wrapped around the brush. Third, iron with a specialist iron which is at once quite clean and not too hot. Test the iron for heat on a sheet of newspaper. If there is the slightest scorching of the paper, allow the iron to cool before using. A too-hot iron dries the wool fibres, makes them brittle and the cloth more susceptible to wear. Iron the bedcloth only; NEVER THE CUSHIONS.
  When a new cloth has been in use a short time small spots will appear. These are often suspected as "moth marks". In fact, they are "cue stabs", caused by players allowing their cues to come into contact with the cloth after striking the ball; an especially common fault - often unsuspected - when the ball is stuck below mid-centre. When the cue tip is thus brought into sharp contact with the cloth, tightly stretched on its unyielding slate bed, a little of the nap is removed and the alleged "moth mark" results. These marks will gradually become less noticeable as the cloth ages. This type of damage is caused all the more frequently if the edges of tips or ferrules are allowed to become sharp or rough, or if the tips do not exactly fit the que. The dropping of balls, or rough placing of rests and snooker trays, can cause similar blemishes; as also can the tossing of coins, which should be absolutely forbidden.
  Occasionally a newly-covered table will be seen to have a line running across it, either lighter or darker than the rest of the cloth. This is a press or fold mark, indicating where the cloth was folded. With regular brushing and ironing this will gradually become less noticeable and will ultimately disappear.
  Cushions require no other maintenance than regular brushing - again, with the run of the nap.

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Faq 6: A word of warning about cushion speed

For reasons too technical to explain here, it should be stressed that no manufacturer can guarantee that a new set of cushions will give a specified degree of speed. Nor is it necessary for players to concern themselves with the number of lengths a ball will run "when hit with maximum force". To judge a table by this test is like trying to measure the "pick-up" of a cricket bat or the "balance" of a racket by the use of scales and footrule. The only speed essential to good play is that there should be sufficient resilience in the cushions for a cue ball to travel easily round the table when a normal stroke is played.

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Tel: 0115 9400268
Fax: 0115 9562494
Office:
1 Park Road, Carlton,
Nottingham NG4 3DE
Showroom:
Unit 6, Davidsella House
Newark Street
Nottingham NG2 4PB
(Please telephone before visiting showroom)
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